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This article has Open Peer Review reports available.

How does Open Peer Review work?

Changing poor mothers' care-seeking behaviors in response to childhood illness: findings from a cross-sectional study in Granada, Nicaragua

BMC International Health and Human Rights201010:10

DOI: 10.1186/1472-698X-10-10

Received: 17 May 2009

Accepted: 1 June 2010

Published: 1 June 2010

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Open Peer Review reports

Pre-publication versions of this article and author comments to reviewers are available by contacting info@biomedcentral.com.

Original Submission
17 May 2009 Submitted Original manuscript
Resubmission - Version 2
Submitted Manuscript version 2
18 May 2009 Author responded Author comments - kayako sakisaka
Resubmission - Version 3
18 May 2009 Submitted Manuscript version 3
13 Jun 2009 Reviewed Reviewer Report - Babar Tasneem Shaikh
5 Nov 2009 Reviewed Reviewer Report - Md. Jasim Uddin
12 Nov 2009 Reviewed Reviewer Report - Mirembe Florenc
27 Jan 2010 Author responded Author comments - kayako sakisaka
Resubmission - Version 4
27 Jan 2010 Submitted Manuscript version 4
22 Feb 2010 Reviewed Reviewer Report - Md. Jasim Uddin
24 Feb 2010 Reviewed Reviewer Report - Babar Tasneem Shaikh
8 Mar 2010 Reviewed Reviewer Report - Mirembe Florenc
Resubmission - Version 5
Submitted Manuscript version 5
Publishing
1 Jun 2010 Editorially accepted
1 Jun 2010 Article published 10.1186/1472-698X-10-10

How does Open Peer Review work?

Open peer review is a system where authors know who the reviewers are, and the reviewers know who the authors are. If the manuscript is accepted, the named reviewer reports are published alongside the article. Pre-publication versions of the article and author comments to reviewers are available by contacting info@biomedcentral.com. All previous versions of the manuscript and all author responses to the reviewers are also available.

You can find further information about the peer review system here.

Authors’ Affiliations

(1)
Takemi Program in International Health, Department of Global Health and Population, Harvard School of Public Health
(2)
Department of Community and Global Health, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo
(3)
Human Development Department, Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA)

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