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Table 6 Reported acceptability and feasibility of CHWs in sexual violence services

From: Should community health workers offer support healthcare services to survivors of sexual violence? a systematic review

  Acceptability Feasibility
Kohli, 2012 [49] Not documented- assessment of whole programme rather than CHWs Not documented- assessment of whole programme rather than CHWs
Tanabe, 2013 [52] Community members interviewed reported that CHWs are trusted members of society that survivors can seek care from CHWs demonstrated comfort with the subject of sexual assault and good understanding of medical treatment; CHWs demonstrated full understanding of confidentiality and data collection; Safety was not an issue of excess concern to CHWs
Barron, 2013 [47] Survivors reported liking the programme & the programme being understandable Cost of delivery was minimal particularly because the facilitators were volunteers. Training & experience contributed to facilitators spending very little time on preparation
Merkin, 1995 [50] Not documented- assessment of programme rather than CHWs No assessment of feasibility documented
Rossman, 1999 [51] Rise in the use of volunteer advocates by 75%; feedback from victims of non-judgemental compassionate support provided No assessment of feasibility documented
Zraly, 2011 [53] Interviewed women found the services useful and particularly when hospital services were inadequate for their needs No assessment of feasibility documented
Itzhaky, 2001 [48] Feeling of trust for community workers developed; Large number of community members becoming involved in the prevention efforts No assessment of feasibility documented